Vacuum tube

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Vacuum-Tubes

A vacuum tube (also called a VT or electron tube ) is a device sometimes used to amplify electronic signals.Vacuum tube was first developed by John Ambrose Fleming in 1904.Vacuum tubes mostly rely on thermionic emission of electrons from a hot filament or a cathode heated by the filament. This type is called a thermionic tube or thermionic valve. A phototube, however, achieves electron emission through the photoelectric effect. Not all electron tubes contain vacuum: gas-filled tubes are devices that rely on the properties of a discharge through an ionized gas.However, tubes are still used in some high-power amplifiers, especially at microwave radio frequencies and in some hi-fi audio systems.Tubes operate at higher voltages than transistors. A typical transistorized amplifier needs 6 to 12 volts to function; an equivalent tube type amplifier needs 200 to 400 volts.Current can only flow in one direction through the device between the two electrodes, as electrons emitted by the hot cathode travel through the tube and are collected by the anode. Adding control grids within the tube allows control of the current between the two electrodes.

Unfortunately, the tube was inefficient as a switch. It consumed a great deal of electrical power and gave off enormous heat—a significant problem in the earlier systems. Primarily because of the heat they generated, tubes were notoriously unreliable—in larger systems, one failed every couple of hours or so.The conversion from tubes to transistors began the trend toward miniaturization that continues to this day. Today’s small laptop PC (or netbook, if you prefer) and even Tablet PC systems, which run on batteries, have more computing power than many earlier systems that filled rooms and consumed huge amounts of electrical power.

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